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Rybky Profile
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X-TRAIL LEGEND
 


Date Registered: 08-2005
Location: Sydney
TOTAL POSTS: 542
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posticon Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


As there has been a recent photo shoot event in QLD and there is interest for similar events in other states, I thought a photography tips & tricks thread might be really useful.

Recently I have started to take more of an interest in photography, having finally bought myself a good camera, and I thought I would start with a simple photography technique that could help you produce great photos.

It is very common for amateur photographers to place the center of interest in the center of the frame. However for hundreds of years (going back to the great painters) there has been this concept called "The rule of thirds", it is based on how your eye moves around a picture. The concept is actually very simple, just divide the frame into a 3 by 3 grid and place the center of interest at, or close to, one of the cross points of the lines. If there is a band of interest, such as a line of cars, then position at one of the two horizontal lines. This has a dramatic effect on the composition of the picture and the impact it can have.

Some digital cameras even have the option to display a 3x3 grid in the view finder or on the screen - yes, that is what it is for!! emoticon

Further information on the rule of thirds can be found on Wikipedia HERE.

With the advent of digital cameras, even if the original photo has not been taken with the rule of thirds in mind, with the magic of cropping in photo editors you can easily change it.

I have used one of Jamie's pictures from the recent QLD meet (hope you don't mind Jamie?!) as an example. Below is the original followed by cropping to position the cars at the top 3rd (giving emphasis to the distance from the camera by showing more ground and less sky) then one where the cars are positioned at the bottom 3rd (more sky gives a feeling of more space and makes it more dramatic):

Image

Image

Image

Personally I prefer the last one, the curve of the road is great and leads the eye into the picture as well.

Anyway, this is just some professional advice from an amateur!! emoticon

I will add others as I learn about them, I am hoping to attend some workshops soon. If anyone else has some experience they can share then please add to this thread!


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- Adam (MY04 Titanium Ti-L)
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23/Nov/2006, 4:47 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message
 
basshead Profile
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Date Registered: 02-2004
Location: Panania, Sydney
TOTAL POSTS: 2852
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


Hi Adam,

I also have an interest in photography, and while I don't have any formal training, I've taken photos of international DJ's (many years ago), car shows, and I keep getting asked by friends to take extra wedding photos & videos (to supplement the professional photographer)...

My new camera is Sony DSC-H1 (bought just before the H2 model hit the shelves) and it was half the price of my previous camera (DSC-S50), and has about twice as many features - most of which I still haven't worked out how to use.

My knowledge of photography is limited, and I still get confused about F-stops, apertures, and which are the correct settings to use. My best shots come from practicing and playing around with the features of the camera.

I've wanted to put up a gallery of my favourite photos I've taken over the years but I just don't have the time to go through the tens of thousands of photos!


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Rich. X-013(c)
'04 S2 ST Auto. Nudge_roofracks_tow_tints_Lightforce_GME_YokoGeoA/T-S_TBS_bashplate_50mm-spacer-lift
Click here to see >300MB of photos and videos All For His Glory.
23/Nov/2006, 5:57 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message MSN Yahoo Blog
 
Rybky Profile
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Date Registered: 08-2005
Location: Sydney
TOTAL POSTS: 542
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


Hi Rich,

I just got myself a Panasonic DMC-FZ50 which is very close to being an SLR without actually being an SLR. It has all the features including manual zoom and focus using rings on the lens barrel which is cool.

I know what you mean about the aperture and shutter speed settings, I keep reading and reading about them and I think I understand the principle but knowing when and how to put them into practise still eludes me!!

Practise makes perfect I guess!! emoticon



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- Adam (MY04 Titanium Ti-L)
Full Hi-Tech exhaust,Koni shocks,Whiteline rear s/bar,front strut bar,K&N filter,eyelids,Pioneer DVD+iPod+Veh Dynamics+rear view camera
24/Nov/2006, 7:15 am Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message
 
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Date Registered: 10-2006
Location: Mona Vale, Sydney, AUSTRALIA
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


HI guys,

Basically its just about aperture controlling depth of field (or what range of distance from the camera is in focus) and shutter speed controlling blurring.

By having the background scenery slightly out of focus when taking a portrait it helps you to show some location details in your picture without having those details 'take over' the picture so that your portrait subject still remains the main interest. This is done by using a larger aperture (smaller number) which if the lens is focussed at 3m might have a range of 2m - 5m in focus with everything behind increasingly blurred in proportion to its distance from the lens. If you want lots of your picture in focus then by focussing on your subject at say 10m and using a small aperture (larger number) you could actually have a range of maybe 5m - infinity in focus with both the foreground subject and the background scenery sharply shown in the photograph.

When you are at sporting events like racing, you mostly want a fast (or higher) shutter speed to 'freeze' the movement so that you get a sharp picture. Sometimes when taking pictures of scenery like a waterfall you want to use a slow (or lower) shutter speed to blur the water to create the illusion of movement in the water while the rocks and landscape which do not move remain sharply in focus.

Both of these settings interact with each other also. If you use a smaller aperture to get more of your picture in focus then you will also need to use a slower shutter speed to expose the photograph correctly since a smaller aperture lets less light through the lens. Oppositely if you use a faster shutter speed to have a moving subject sharply in focus then you will need to use a larger aperture to increase the amount of light through the lens to compensate for the lower exposure of the fast shutter speed.

Hope this goes someway to helping you understand this a little.

---
Kev X450(c) T30 Guru
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waky53 Profile
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Date Registered: 06-2005
Location: Barossa Valley
TOTAL POSTS: 286
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


With the increasing use of digital cameras, most people hold them in 2 hands & look at the rear LCD screen. The old style cameras where you hold it up to your face & look through the viewfinder means the camera is braced & so less blurring when you press the shutter button.
Try this method with your digital camera, I'm sure most still have a normal viewfinder and your pictures may be less blurred than just holding with 2 shaky hands.

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Regards Dave, X162 Oct 04 Series 2 ST
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25/Nov/2006, 12:59 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message
 
Canadas FarEast Profile
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Date Registered: 10-2005
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


Some of today's cameras even have an IS (image stabilization) system which can compensate for the "shaky hands" syndrome.

I have a Canon PowerShot S2 with this feature and find it quite good.

---
Roger
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25/Nov/2006, 9:47 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message
 
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Date Registered: 08-2005
Location: NEWCASTLE
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posticon Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


 emoticon Good Choice Roger you have good taste when it comes to vehicles and also camera's as this is the same camera I have S2iS emoticon

Last edited by Dave4x4, 26/Nov/2006, 12:16 pm


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(Dave Newcastle 2004 ST
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25/Nov/2006, 9:51 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message
 
Revhead Kev Profile
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Date Registered: 10-2006
Location: Mona Vale, Sydney, AUSTRALIA
TOTAL POSTS: 6115
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


Dave, Roger & Dave,

I agree with everything you have all said, but by referring to stopping blurring in photographs with a fast shutter speed I mentioned fast moving objects, not shakey hands.
Rich and Adam mentioned they were not clear about when and for what they should vary the aperture and shutter speed so my description was to give them a small understanding of these.


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Kev X450(c) T30 Guru
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basshead Profile
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Date Registered: 02-2004
Location: Panania, Sydney
TOTAL POSTS: 2852
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


quote:

Revhead Kev wrote:

Dave, Roger & Dave,

I agree with everything you have all said, but by referring to stopping blurring in photographs with a fast shutter speed I mentioned fast moving objects, not shakey hands.
Rich and Adam mentioned they were not clear about when and for what they should vary the aperture and shutter speed so my description was to give them a small understanding of these.



I'll have to keep practicing with the camera settings I think. I always get blurry subjects (from their movement) when in low-light conditions (indoors) no matter what settings I use on the camera.



---
Rich. X-013(c)
'04 S2 ST Auto. Nudge_roofracks_tow_tints_Lightforce_GME_YokoGeoA/T-S_TBS_bashplate_50mm-spacer-lift
Click here to see >300MB of photos and videos All For His Glory.
26/Nov/2006, 8:18 am Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message MSN Yahoo Blog
 
Revhead Kev Profile
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Date Registered: 10-2006
Location: Mona Vale, Sydney, AUSTRALIA
TOTAL POSTS: 6115
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Re: Say CHEESE! Photography tips & tricks


Ahhh, low light conditions.

When there is not much light available to expose the photograph correctly, the camera chooses a slower shutter speed to expose the photo for a longer time, and also chooses a larger aperture to let more light through the lens. Sometimes there is just not enough light to expose the photo correctly without the shutter speed being so low that you now get blurring from the camera shaking. This is when you need to use a flash for supplimentary lighting and your camera will usually have some warning that the shutter speed is too slow for sharp pictures.

Some of the newer digital cameras will let you change the ISO setting which is the equivalent of 'film speed'. A larger number for the ISO setting will allow the camera to expose the photograph with a faster shutter speed in low light conditions. Unfortunately, higher ISO settings on digital cameras also cause digital 'noise' to show up on the photograph which looks like a colour snow haze across the picture.

---
Kev X450(c) T30 Guru
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26/Nov/2006, 2:32 pm Link to this post Send Email PM   Send Private Message Blog
 


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